CEEA/ACEG 2018 ConferenceRegistration

Registration is open until May 27, 2018 CDT

Early bird registration is closed. Registration requires the creation of an account and a current membership with CEEA.

Regular Rates

Professional Rate: $675.00
Student Rate: $250.00

Early Bird Rates

Professional Rate: $575.00
Student Rate: $225.00

Register Today

Workshops

CEEA-ACEG Member Workshop Registration
 
This year, we are offering the regular Sunday workshops, as well as the teaching and research institute. Registration for ALL Workshops is required prior to arriving on site to allow for proper planning of the organizing hosts and facilitators.
 
  • The research institute runs all day Sunday, so that can be taken as an alternative to participating in the Sunday workshops
  • The teaching institute runs over the duration of the conference, and so you can still take workshops in the first three slots on Sunday
  • The CEEA-ACEG member fee is $80 across the board and that covers as many Sunday workshops as you like, the research institute, or the teaching institute + Sunday workshops

Workshop registration includes: 

  • access to workshops on June 3 (registration required)
  • lunch on June 3
  • Cost: $ 80.00 for the day for CEEA-ACEG members, although registration for each individual workshop will be required to allow for planning

 

Workshop Only Registration

If you would like to Workshops only, the fee for the research and teaching institute and/or Sunday workshops is $100.00.  You do not need to be a member to attend the Workshop only sessions. You will need to register through EventBrite at: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/2018-ceea-aceg-conference-single-day-workshop-and-ier-registration-registration-45734551274.  Please ensure that you list which workshops you will be attending on the EventBrite payment page.

  

Learn MoreIER: Institute for Engineering Education Research

June 03, 2018, 08:45 - 18:00

Institute for Engineering Education Research 

Sunday, June 3, 2018 8:45AM - 6:00PM

This full-day workshop will help participants setup and run research studies in engineering education. The workshop will cover several aspects of the research process, including defining research questions, the selection of methods and methodology, research ethics, literature reviews and the role of reflection in research. Participants will have an opportunity to work on their own plan for a research study in engineering education.


By the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Develop a research question and select a relevant framework or perspective
  2. Select a method or set of methods and design an approach to collect data
  3. Apply ethical human subject research principles to develop appropriate strategy
  4. Analyze and draw conclusions from data
  5. Appreciate their own worldview and the importance of reflexivity as an engineering education researcher
  6. Conduct a systematic review of relevant engineering education literature  

The workshop will be comprised of several sessions, which are designed to highlight major processes and considerations in engineering education research: 

Session 1: Planning Engineering Education Research

Participants will discuss the identification and framing of a research question or goal, and the role of a theoretical framework in engineering education research.  

Session 2: Selecting Methods and Methodology 

Participants will consider the variety of research methods available, and how to select methods and a methodology based on your research question. 

Session 3: Exploring Research Methods

Participants will cycle through 2 mini-sessions, providing an opportunity to learn more about different major methodology frameworks, such as qualitative methods, quantitative methods and design science research. 

Session 4: Ethics & Fairness 

Participants will learn about human research ethics, including institutional and national requirements, and how ethics requirements vary by type of study, university, and other considerations. 

Session 5: Building a Community of Reflective and Responsive Researchers
What constitutes rigorous research at all stages, from conception to dissemination?How does a researcher situate themselves within the larger epistemological conversation to exercise informed judgment? Participants will explore these and other questions to advance the discussion around rigorous practices and policies in engineering education research.

Session 6: Conducting a Systematic Review in Engineering Education Research

Participants in this activity focused session will delve a little deeper into the systematic review methodology, through development of a search strategy, searching article databases and grey literature sources. Participants will learn about the screening process and managing references, and selecting articles based on the inclusion criteria.

 

IER Facilitators:
Susan McCahan, Vice Provost, Innovations in Undergraduate Education, University of Toronto
Sean Maw, Huff Chair in Innovative Teaching, University of Saskatchewan
Sylvie Doré, Profession, Mechanical Engineering, École de technologie supérieure
Deborah Tihanyi, Associate Professor Teaching Stream and Director, Engineering Communication Program, University of Toronto
Jillian Seniuk Cicek, Instructor and Research Assistant, University of Manitoba
Penny Kinnear, Instructor and Coordinator of Professional Language Development, Engineering Communication Program, University of Toronto
Patricia Sheridan, Assistant Professor Teaching Stream, Institute for Leadership Education in Engineering, University of Toronto
Ursula Ellis, Librarian, University of British Columbia
Sarah Parker, Librarian, University of British Columbia
Lisa Romkey, Associate Professor, Teaching Stream and Associate Director, Engineering Education Program, University of Toronto
 

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 1A - CANCELLED: Inclusive Pedagogy in Engineering Education - CANCELLED

June 03, 2018, 08:45 - 10:15

Workshop title: Inclusive Pedagogy in Engineering Education

Workshop description: This workshop provides participants with opportunities to actively engage in discussions regarding contemporary diversity issues and think about how to use inclusive pedagogy in our engineering classrooms. Just as our engineering learning environments are complex, so are the individuals that comprise them. Everyone has visible as well as “invisible” cultural identities, and inclusive pedagogy attends to those differences. Inclusive pedagogy seeks to engage learners in ways that are inclusive and supports environments that are attentive to diversity. It also helps prepare participants to contribute productively to an increasingly complex and globalized society by helping them develop a broader understanding of domestic and global diversity issues. The goal of inclusive pedagogy in engineering education is to provide tools to develop a learning environment that promotes equity, diversity, and support for all students, allowing them to better develop professional skills like teamwork, communication, and interdisciplinarity; but not to the expense of the development of the required technical skills. The topics that we will explore in the workshop are: • Critical pedagogy • Unintended biases • Micro-aggressions • Anti-Teaching / Mindful Learning • Engaging the Imaginations of Digital Learners • Student-centered tools  

Facilitators | 1. Dr. Homero Murzi, Associate Prof. of Practice, Department of Engineering Education, Virginia Tech.

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Develop a critically engaged, self-reflective teaching praxis that goes beyond content delivery.

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Critically evaluate the principles of a diverse and inclusive learning environment.

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Identify diversity and inclusion topics (like unintended bias and micro-aggressions) within a global context.

Workshop learning objectives | 4. Develop engaging course materials by collaborative, dialogic interaction with others.

Learn MoreWorkshop 1B: WeBWorK for beginners part I: Using WeBWorK

June 03, 2018, 08:45 - 10:15

Workshop title: WeBWorK for beginners part I: Using WeBWorK

Workshop description: his hands-on workshop will cover how to use existing problems and create new problems for WeBWorK by modifying some of the existing problems. WeBWorK is an open online homework system which was developed for math and is increasingly being used for engineering courses. You will also learn how to find questions in the WeBWorK Open Problem Library a freely accessible bank of over 35,000 questions created and tested by instructors at institutions around the world. Facilitated by instructors who are developing problems and using WeBWorK in their courses, this workshop will allow participants to acquire the key knowledge needed to start implementing WeBWorK in their own courses. We hope you will also join us for part II of this workshop which details how to share your problems openly for others to use.

Facilitators | 1. Agnes d’Entremont, PhD, Instructor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of British Columbia
Facilitators | 2. Negar M. Harandi, PhD, Teaching and Learning Fellow, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia
Facilitators | 3. Luis Linares, PhD, Sr. Instructor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia
Facilitators | 4. Patrick Walls, PhD, Instructor, Department of Mathematics, University of British Columbia
Facilitators | 5. Jonathan Verrett, PhD, Instructor, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Describe the WeBWorK open online homework system and explain its benefits and drawbacks

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Describe the general WeBWorK taxonomy for organizing problems

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Find and assign problems from the WeBWorK Open Problem Library (OPL)

Workshop learning objectives | 4. Modify existing problems in the WeBWorK coding language

Workshop learning objectives | 5. Modify existing problems in the WeBWorK coding language

Learn MoreWorkshop 1C: Greening Engineering in a Learner-Centered Participatory Environment

June 03, 2018, 08:45 - 10:15

Workshop title: Greening Engineering in a Learner-Centered Participatory Environment

Workshop description: “Greening” is about acquiring, reflecting, sharing, and applying knowledge across disciplines in a learner-centered participatory environment with sustainability in mind. In typical engineering education, theoretical understanding is required prior to practical experimentation. As a consequence, engineering competence is needed before one can be creative. However, innovation often means simultaneously learning and creating new knowledge; therefore, traditional analytic and systematic approaches may not be adequate and is necessary to boost knowledge creation and promote entrepreneurial mindsets within engineering education. To realize this goal, two open educational resources (www.g9toengineering and www.greenengineers.ca) were developed by the instructor to explore knowledge creation and sharing through “reflective practice” and “learning by doing”.

Facilitators | 1. Riadh W. Y. Habash, PhD, P.Eng, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), University of Ottawa

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Understand the key features that enhance knowledge creation in engineering education.

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Highlight the classroom and experiential aspects that make engineering green such as creativity and innovation, entrepreneurship, design, leadership and professionalism.

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Promote student empowerment where an instructor serves as a “guide” and a “resource” to students, rather than as leader.

Learn MoreWorkshop 1D: Outcome-Based Assessment and Continuous Improvement Made Simple

June 03, 2018, 08:45 - 10:15

Workshop title: Outcome-Based Assessment and Continuous Improvement Made Simple

Workshop description: The new outcome-based assessment and its associated continuous improvement (OBA & CI) is still in early development phase. The accreditation process is getting more complex, more costly, and more overwhelming. The purpose of this workshop is simplify the process and introduce the workshop participants a set of tools and artifacts that can be used to facilitate the data collection, engage the faculty and the students, create a data-driven continuous improvement process, and activate the process.

Facilitators | 1. Mohamed Ismail, PhD, MBA, MSc, Assistant Professor, Industrial Systems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering & Applied Science, University of Regina

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Participants will try to define the target products (the student/the program), the process, and the the system.

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Participants will try to know what data is needed, how to collect it, and how we can befit from it. 

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Participants will try to report their experience with data collection and some best practices will be shared.

Workshop learning objectives | 4. Participants will learn how to analyze the data and engage the faculty members.

Workshop learning objectives | 5. Participants will learn how to analyze the data and engage the faculty members.

Workshop learning objectives | 6. Participants will learn how to create continuous improvement events and close the loop. 

Learn MoreWorkshop 1E: Community Engaged Learning in Engineering: Exploring Challenges and Effective Practise

June 03, 2018, 08:45 - 10:15

Workshop title: Community Engaged Learning in Engineering: Exploring Challenges and Effective Practise

Workshop description: Community engaged learning in engineering courses can be transformative opportunity for students to test and apply their learning.  What makes our practise effective?  What challenges are we as educators facing?  In this workshop we provide a brief overview of key components of community engaged learning (CEL) and the landscape of CEL courses within engineering departments at the University of British Columbia (UBC). We will set the context for the discussion hearing from two UBC Faculty of Applied Science instructors from Civil and Electrical Engineering and the community engaged learning models they use. Facilitated table top discussions on what makes for effective practice and the challenges we face implementing community engaged learning will follow.  The workshop will serve to address faculty questions, challenges and share good practise. 

Facilitators | 1. Patricia Keen, PhD, Department of Civil Engineering, University of British Columbia
Facilitators | 2. Paul Lusina, PhD, Research Associate, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia
Facilitators | 3. Kyle Nelson, Centre for Community-Engaged Learning, University of British Columbia
Facilitators | 4. Madeleine Zammar, Centre for Community-Engaged Learning, University of British Columbia

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Participants will learn how UBC’s Centre for Community Engaged Learning supports engineering courses and programs in the Faculty of Applied Science at UBC.

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Participants will learn about two different models for community engaged learning in engineering courses. 

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Participants will identify and discuss good practices and challenges in integrating community engaged learning into their courses.

Workshop learning objectives | 4. Participants will consider how to apply good practices of community engaged learning (CEL) to a current course, project or challenge they are working on. 

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 2A: STEM in 3 Acts: Building Engineering Identity in Rural Students

June 03, 2018, 10:30 - 12:00

Workshop title: STEM in 3 Acts: Building Engineering Identity in Rural Students

Workshop description: Washington State has the fourth largest percentage of second language speakers in rural areas in the U.S.  Rural students have been recognized as living in an environment conducive to an engineering mind set.  Both of these concepts - rural experience and second language use - should make rural, minority students great candidates for careers in engineering as outlined by the seven year study on "Attributes of a Global Engineer".  Yet we know that few rural minority students choose engineering in their post secondary studies.  Raising awareness of engineering and connecting it to a sense of community prevalent in small rural environments is the intent of this introductory workshop for middle school students.  Used in 8 rural school districts in Washington State, the workshop puts students in teams to solve real world engineering problems from across the globe.  The first of these 30 minute projects is a timed, collaborative puzzle to build teaming skills, the second is brainstorming a water capture solution for a remote school in Panama and the third is building a prototype for a vertical farming structure in the streets of Mali.  The workshop will address each of the 3 projects in abbreviated format in order to give participants time to reflect and comment on the process.

Facilitators | 1. Barbara Peterson - Executive Director, NLA Group

Facilitators | 2. Hillary Martinez - GEAR UP Site Director, Wenatchee High School

Facilitators | 3. Dylan Kling - GEAR UP Site Director, Quincy High School

Facilitators | 4. Blair Sant - GEAR UP Site Director, Tonasket High School

Facilitators | 5. Felix Guera - GEAR UP Site Director, Wenatchee High School

Facilitators | 6. Juan Pore - GEAR UP Site Director, Quincy High School

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Workshop participants will be introduced briefly to the Attributes of a Global Engineer and the focus on middle school to introduce students to these attributes.

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Participants will understand the various stages in the engineering design process as presented to middle school students.

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Participants will observe and collaborate in a team environment with a specific assignment.

Workshop learning objectives | 4. Participants will use 21st century skills of creativity, collaboration, critical thinking and communication.

Workshop learning objectives | 5. Participants will be aware of how engineers solve every day problems in other parts of the world.

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 2B: WeBWorK for beginners part II: Developing in WeBWorK for the Open Problem Library

June 03, 2018, 10:30 - 12:00

Workshop title: WeBWorK for beginners part II: Developing in WeBWorK for the Open Problem Library

Workshop description: This hands-on workshop will focus on developing new problems for WeBWorK and sharing them in the Open Problem Library. WeBWorK is an open online homework system which was developed for math and is increasingly being used for engineering courses. The WeBWorK Open Problem Library a freely accessible bank of over 35,000 questions created and tested by instructors at institutions around the world. This is a great resource, however there is still a lack of engineering problems, with only a few disciplinary areas currently covered. We hope to generate momentum in the engineering community to eventually build substantial problem banks for all disciplines/subjects in engineering. If you are new to WeBWorK feel free to also join us for part I of our workshop series on WeBWorK.

Facilitators | 1. Agnes d’Entremont, PhD, Instructor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of British Columbia
Facilitators | 2. Negar M. Harandi, PhD, Teaching and Learning Fellow, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia
Facilitators | 3. Luis Linares, PhD, Sr. Instructor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia
Facilitators | 4. Patrick Walls, PhD, Instructor, Department of Mathematics, University of British Columbia
Facilitators | 5. Jonathan Verrett, PhD, Instructor, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Describe the general WeBWorK taxonomy for organizing problems

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Modify existing problems in the WeBWorK coding language

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Describe in basic terms how to use GitHub and git to manage contributions to the OPL (and institutional libraries)

Workshop learning objectives | 4. Understand the variety of ways to store and develop WeBWorK questions and the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 2C: "Designing and Giving Effective Presentations: Building a Shared Understanding With Your Presentations”

June 03, 2018, 10:30 - 12:00

Workshop title: "Designing and Giving Effective Presentations: Building a Shared Understanding With Your Presentations”

Workshop description: This workshop shares strategies, techniques, and rationales for organizing and delivering presentations in diverse contexts. The workshop will emphasize connecting the “why” with the “how” of effective presentations. Throughout the workshop, participants will engage in activities to build their skills in preparing and giving effective presentations.

Participants who attend the workshop are asked to bring their ideas for an upcoming presentation that they are scheduled to give, but that has yet to be created. In other words, not your CEEA-ACEG 2018 presentation! Rather, a future presentation that you can work on from the ideation stage during the workshop. If you have any questions, please email Penny Kinnear at: penny.kinnear@utoronto.ca.

Facilitators | 1. Penny Kinnear, University of Toronto

Facilitators | 2. Jillian Seniuk Cicek, University of Manitoba

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Apply communication analysis concepts to diverse presentation scenarios.

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Connect analysis results to specific content organization and delivery choices.

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 2D: “Aware and engaged”: Graduate Attributes and you

June 03, 2018, 10:30 - 12:00

Workshop title: “Aware and engaged”: Graduate Attributes and you

Workshop description: According to CEAB’s latest Accreditation Criteria and Procedures, “All faculty members… are expected to be aware of and engaged in outcomes-based assessment”.  How would you rate your awareness and engagement?  This workshop is for anyone who’s newly involved in accreditation and wants to know more: instructors who have been asked to collect assessment data from their course; department chairs facing the first accreditation since their appointment; people who’ve recently been told they’re now in charge of the process.  The session will walk participants through the three big questions of graduate attributes and the curriculum improvement process: What is CEAB making us do?  Why?  And what’s my role in all this?

Facilitators | 1. Margaret Gwyn, University of Victoria

Facilitators | 2. Jake Kaupp, Queens University

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Describe the differences between the previous input-based accreditation model, and the new input + output-based model

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Understand basic GACIP-related vocabulary

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Summarize GACIP-related accreditation requirements, and find the official CEAB documents detailing these

Workshop learning objectives | 4. Define your role in the accreditation context

Workshop learning objectives | 5. Identify resources to support GACIP at your school

Workshop learning objectives | 6. Build your own personal network and catalog new ideas learned from your peers

Learn MoreWorkshop 2E: “You want to do what??” Hands-on activities for large groups in non-lab space

June 03, 2018, 10:30 - 12:00

Workshop title: “You want to do what??” Hands-on activities for large groups in non-lab space

Workshop description: Do you want to engage a large group of students with hands-on activities, but running into issues?  How can you give 225 first-year students a hands-on, exploratory chemistry experience, all at the same time, and not in a lab?   The workshop facilitators will walk you through the process that they used to design this chemistry activity for a large class of mechatronics engineering students.  Attendees will quickly run through the activity, connecting gas pressure, reaction kinetics and manometer design. Attendees will then collaborate with peers to prototype an activity for their courses.   Intentional design and the connection to graduate attributes were foundational in the design of this activity and will be considered, as well as important hurdles and how to deal with common issues, such as cost, safety, and cleanliness.   Bring your bottleneck concepts, thinking caps, and a joy of tinkering! 

Facilitators | 1. Mary Robinson, University of Waterloo

Facilitators | 2. Eugene Li, University of Waterloo

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Development of a scalable lab

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Working with limited resources

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 3A: Teaching Ideation to Engineering Students in Order to Foster Better Ideas and More Socially Responsible Leadership

June 03, 2018, 13:00 - 14:30

Workshop title: Teaching Ideation to Engineering Students in Order to Foster Better Ideas and More Socially Responsible Leadership

Workshop description: Whether taking an introductory engineering design course, implementing a capstone design project, or participating in a business elective, engineering students are usually very good at 'implementing it right'. But they often struggle when it comes to 'implementing the right it'. In our engineering programs we train students to understand a problem and then excel at implementing solutions. Yet, while the students we graduate do go on to be engineering leaders of that kind of work in our organizations, that way of working and the associated mindset on its own can actually hold them back and, in extreme cases, the solutions they end up implementing can result in significant unintended societal challenges.   With our students and graduates, we might see this in the context of them reaching their potential in multidisciplinary school work, when they start an entrepreneurial venture based on a science or technology, and when they graduate to leading strategic initiatives in a corporate setting. We might also point to this as a contributing factor in challenges such as those highlighted in the news of late where technology leaders didn't realize or aren't prepared to manage the consequences of what they have been building (e.g. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/nov/19/how-tech-leaders-delivered-us-into-evil-john-naughton and https://www.wired.com/story/the-other-tech-bubble and https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/the-science-of-ai-and-the-art-of-social-responsibility_us_58a4b920e4b0b0e1e0e205b9).  In this highly experiential workshop, we will introduce engineering educators to a pedagogical framework for strategic ideation - the process of discovering, designing, and assessing ideas with the highest potential for positive impact. We will engage a suite of practical tools and proven classroom practices - including ideastorming, idea modeling, idea pressure testing, and idea assessment - for helping students get beyond just understanding a problem and implementing a solution, to also understanding which are the right problems and designing a portfolio of the highest potential solutions from which to choose in order to optimize wellbeing. We will discuss how all of this can, in turn, help them meet practical objectives in their work as engineers and leaders, such as: designing higher impact products and ventures; committing scarce resources in the most efficient ways possible; and avoiding possible unintended negative societal consequences of one's work.   This will be an engaging 90-minute session in which educators will be asked to engage as participants in the activities, just as would their students, and they will be facilitated in discussions about how to take it home to their own classrooms. Participants will each get their own Idea Design Kit, and related worksheets and summary handouts.   Facilitator bio: Dr. Alex Bruton helps people (learn to) innovate. He's spoken and led workshops around the world, including an invited talk at Google, and he's been recognized as Entrepreneurial Educator of the Year in Canada. He's been an engineer, a manager, a several time entrepreneur, and a tenured professor of entrepreneurship (in both business and engineering schools) - among other exciting roles. Today he's a tenured faculty member at the University of Calgary, the founder and president of a practical open education and innovation design firm, and the co-founder of The Straight Up Business Institute.

Facilitators | 1. Dr. Alex Bruton, P.Eng., MBA, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. To provide examples of how engineers think and work differently than others in the classroom, in the workplace, and in society when it comes to ideation - this notion that their training tends to make them better at 'implementing it right' than 'implementing the right it'

Workshop learning objectives | 2. To provide a pedagogical framework and practical tools for helping students discover and design high potential ideas

Workshop learning objectives | 3. To experience those tools from the perspective of the learner, and with the benefit of parallel insights provided from the perspective of the teacher

Workshop learning objectives | 4. To demonstrate and discuss how the framework and tools can be implemented and assessed as part of the engineering curriculum

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 3B: The Conrad Games in Engineering: Encouraging Entrepreneurship and Innovation Mindsets

June 03, 2018, 13:00 - 14:30

Workshop title: The Conrad Games in Engineering: Encouraging Entrepreneurship and Innovation Mindsets

Workshop description: This workshop introduces the Conrad Games in Engineering, a new initiative out of the Conrad Business, Entrepreneurship and Technology Centre at the University of Waterloo.  The games  aim to engage and encourage undergraduate engineering students in entrepreneurship and innovation mindsets. Through a  short series of four one-hour sessions at lunchtime on campus, the games reawaken a sense of fun and creativity while students enjoy a complimentary lunch provided by our corporate sponsor, Thomson Reuters.  Students participation is monitored  over a season (i.e., school term of 4months) and points are awarded to all participants and teams to “compete” for prizes at the end of the season..  Students register in teams ranging in size from 2 members to 4 members.  The teams  compete in fun, challenging  engineering activities that last no more than 20 minutes over lunch to win points for their houses (engineering departments) throughout the Conrad Games season.  The challenges are always a surprise; competitors do not know what the game will be until they arrive.  Challenges are designed to use commonly available materials to keep the cost of the games low.  Participants are always “unplugged” since no Wi-Fi or internet access is allowed during an activity.,  Competitors use good old-fashioned “roll up your sleeves” engineering design skills and “engin-uity” to quickly prototype a solution to a challenge. Throughout each season, we have had special challenge teams, composed of faculty, alumni, and staff invited to compete against the students for an additional friendly challenge.  This game season environment encourages student engagement and community development across departments and with faculty and engineering alumni.  The costs include small, portable materials and tools that can be assembled quickly into kits and brought into classrooms, lunch budgeted per student and prize awards at the end of school term season.  The materials for the kits are used again in future school term seasons with variations to encourage creativity and risk/reward assessment.  For classroom capacity of approximately 50 people, we have budgeted for $2,500 per school term season of (3-4 months).  We have secured a strategic corporate sponsor, Thomson Reuters, and the sponsorship covers each school term season.  The sponsor has general visibility with the engineering students and provides small handouts/giveaways at the lunch time sessions.  Outreach opportunities - the games kits have already been used at an elementary school; high school and the first-year student residences are also planned for events.  Social media for the games are through Facebook group, Twitter, Instagram and short videos are created at the games sessions.  This workshop invites attendees to experience  a Conrad Games challenge firsthand as participants. We will share photos, videos, and stories of previous challenges at the University of Waterloo.  We will also discuss an engineering outreach activity based on the Conrad Games.  This activity was conducted at a local elementary school to inspire a future generation of engineers.  We will share key learnings from the past two seasons of Conrad Games challenges.  The workshop will close with a breakout session to discuss how to initiate a similar series of challenges at your university as well as an interactive discussion of possible future challenge activities.  

Facilitators | 1. Emily Peat, Undergraduate BETS and E Co-op Advisor, Conrad Business Entrepreneurship and Technology Centre

Facilitators | 2. Wayne Chang, Lecturer and Enterprise Co-op Coordinator, Conrad Business, Entrepreneurship and Technology Centre

Facilitators | 3. Dr. William D. Bishop, P.Eng., Continuing Lecturer, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo

Facilitators | 4. Eyram Dornor, MBET, Computer Engineering Class of 2016, University of Waterloo 

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Formulate design challenges to promote entrepreneurship and innovation mindsets

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Evaluate the key elements of a successful engineering design challenge and season

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Analyze benefits of participation for students, staff, faculty, and alumni

Workshop learning objectives | 4. Understand how challenges can engage participants in engineering design

Workshop learning objectives | 5. Apply ways to promote community engagement and outreach

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 3C: Creating Engaging Video Content to Support Curriculum Delivery

June 03, 2018, 13:00 - 14:30

Workshop title: Creating Engaging Video Content to Support Curriculum Delivery

Workshop description: Workshop Category: Implementation of Educational Technologies  Workshop Description: (90 minutes) A major challenge at universities today, is delivering engaging and effective material to large classes. Learning management systems and access to laptops, tablet and other video playback devices is now ubiquitous on university campuses. .  It is also well understood that video material can provide for increased engagement and flexibility in classroom activity through “flipped classrooms”, detailed demonstrations supporting lab activities and a variety of other techniques.  One of the barriers to faculty creating videos for in course delivery is to develop the confidence to invest in the learning curve of understanding the techniques and then start the process of becoming proficient with the hardware software needed to produce relevant content. In Fall 2017 The School of Engineering at the University of Guelph set up a simple, configurable multimedia studio to build capacity for faculty and teaching assistants to learn to create effective videos for use in the classroom; ranging from capture of PowerPoint presentations, to demonstration of software, and the development of “chalk and talk style” video materials.  In this workshop, we will give a brief overview of the configuration of the studio and the tools and software used to develop effective curriculum for the classroom.  This will be followed by hands on sessions where participants use customizable templates to create simple hands-on examples of videos of their own.  

Facilitators | 1. John Donald, Associate Professor, P.Eng., School of Engineering, University of Guelph

Facilitators | 2. Andrea Bradford, Associate Professor, School of Engineering, University of Guelph

Facilitators | 3. Samantha Mehltretter, MASc Student, School of Engineering, University of Guelph

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Appreciate the requirements for generating one’s own video material for use in a flipped classroom approach or to supplement labs or lectures.

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Participate in the construction of a short video clip. 

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Develop confidence to develop and apply video content in your own course delivery.

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 3D: EGAD Workshop 1: Running a continuous improvement process in engineering

June 03, 2018, 13:00 - 14:30

Workshop title: EGAD Workshop 1: Running a continuous improvement process in engineering

Workshop description: This introductory workshop is intended to help programs run an effective continuous program improvement process. It highlights principles of assessment and change management from the research literature, and gives examples of how the six steps recommended by EGAD have been implemented in Canada: (1) defining goals, (2) mapping the curriculum, (3) collecting data, (4) analyzing and interpreting data, (5) improving curricula, and (6) managing change. It will provide an opportunity for participants to compare their approaches with those at other institutions.

Facilitators | 1. Brian Frank (EGAD Project Coordinator), Associate Dean (Teaching and Learning); Queen's University
Facilitators | 2. Margaret Gwyn, Accreditation Analyst, Faculty of Engineering; University of Victoria

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Participants will be aware of some key principles of managing change and assessment.

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Participants will be able to compare approaches to implementing the EGAD-recommended six-step process.

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Participants will be able to contrast the process at their institution with those of other participants.

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 3E: Teaching science communication via Gwyneth Paltrow (and other cases in popular science)

June 03, 2018, 13:00 - 14:30

Workshop title: Teaching Science Communication via Gwyneth Paltrow (and other Case Studies in Popular Science)

Workshop description: The ability to effectively communicate science and engineering to the public is skill that will be important to the success of many of our students, regardless of whether they go into industry or graduate school. We can teach "science communication" in essentially two ways. The first is as a "how-to" course, developing techniques, strategies and principles for science communication and applying them to their own research. With undergraduate students, however, this approach has its limits, since it depends on a deep understanding of and investment in the research being translated for the public.   In my lightning talk for the 2017 CEEA conference [1], I described an alternative, case-study driven approach to teaching popular science communication, where we can engage key issues, concerns, and strategies for communicating science to the public by examining how they have played out in controversial and important cases.  The urgency of these cases helps with student engagement, and critical analysis of these cases will help facilitate a media savvy which will then foster the students’ development of techniques and strategies for the poplar communication of science. Furthermore, because of the public impact of these cases, these cases are also relevant to issues around engineering ethics and its relationship to society.    These cases include:   1. The prosecution of scientists for the L'aquila Earthquake 2. NASA's 2010 Astrobiology press conference 3. The Toronto Star's 2015 Gardasil vaccine story 4. Gwyneth Paltrow's GOOP & celebrity pseudoscience   5. Climate change and the "Framing Science" editorial in Science (2008)  In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to experience one of these case studies in depth and learn more about up to 4 others: they will leave the materials and references to form a bank of cases they can take back and integrate into their own teaching - whether that be an ethics, engineering and society, or communication course.   [1] A. Chong. "Moving Beyond the Boundaries of Engineering Communication: Teaching Media Savviness to Engineering Students." Presented at CEEA 2017, Toronto, ON, June 4-7th, 2017. 

Facilitators | 1. Alan Chong, Engineering Communication Program, Faculty of Applied Science, University of Toronto

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. To develop a working understanding of key concepts underlying science communication to the public

Workshop learning objectives | 2. To collaboratively develop strategies for critically assessing popular media representations of science and technology research

Workshop learning objectives | 3. To learn about and share up to five popular case studies in science communication 

Workshop learning objectives | 4. To identify ways in which these case studies could be integrated into various types of engineering courses

 

Learn MoreIET: Institute for Engineering Education Teaching

June 03, 2018, 14:45 - 18:00

Institute for Engineering Education Teaching

This is series of SIX workshops on teaching in engineering, starting with workshop blocks 4 and 5 on Sunday, and continuing during blocks throughout the conference (Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday).  Registrants are expected to complete all six workshops (exceptions can be made for conflicts with paper/poster presentations), and a certificate of completion will be provided.  
Our CEEA Institute of Engineering Teaching (IET) will consist of a cohesive series of six workshops that will cover multiple aspects of teaching, learning, and course design. The program will be both suitable for veteran faculty who want to upgrade, refresh, or learn new best practices in teaching and learning, and for new instructors to get a solid foundation in teaching practice. 
Schedule:
  • Sessions 1 and 2 - Sunday, June 3, 2018,  2:45 - 6:00
  • Session 3 - Monday, June 4, 2018, 2:45 - 4:00
  • Session 4 - Tuesday, June 5, 2018, 2:45 - 4:00
  • Session 5 - Wednesday, June 6, 2018, 8:15 - 9:30
  • Session 6 - Wednesday, June 6, 2018, 2:45 - 4:00
Workshop description: 
Session 1: Designing Great Courses
In this workshop you will be introduced to effective course design that begins with understanding who your students are, deciding what you want them to learn; determining how you will measure student learning; and planning activities, assignments, and materials that support student learning. We will discuss different strategies for course design and teaching that focus on enhancing student learning.
 
Learning Objectives:
  • Explain the 3 inter-dependent components of good course design
  • Develop major course-level learning outcomes using ABCD model
  • Select/Design learning activities to help students achieve those outcomes
  • Appreciate that we must thoughtfully link  outcomes to activities to assessment methods
 
Session 2: What’s the Plan? 
A solid plan for both your course and each class session is an important foundation for a great student course experience. A great syllabus and complete lesson plans can help motivate your students and help them learn more effectively.  In this workshop, you will develop a simple lesson plan using the SET-BODY-CLOSE model, and take first steps to create a more learner-centered syllabus that empowers students to be adult learners and downplays your role policing students behaviour and work.
 
Learning Objectives:
  • List the major components of the Set-Body-Close model
  • Apply the Set-Body-Close lesson plan model
  • Explain 3 advantages of changing the language in your syllabus to be more learner-centered
  • Rewrite syllabus prompts to make them more learner-centered
 
Session 3: Assess like an Expert 
This will be a practical workshop that will help you design tests and other assessments that will help you measure the intended outcomes of your instruction. The workshop will specifically cover test planning, item writing, and test assembly, test administration, and the interpretation of test results.  A major focus will be on test planning and how it needs to integrate into other assessment activities in your courses.
 
Learning Objectives:
  • Explain the concept of constructive alignment as applied to testing and assessment
  • Develop a simple test plan
  • Write items of different types and difficulty
Session 4: How People Learn 
Research into how people learn has grown enormously over the last twenty-five years. We know, for example, that students are not passive recipients of information, but, instead, actively construct their own knowledge and understanding. Neuroscience and Educational Psychology have come together and given important insight that can be applied to designing good instructional practices. Come learn about the role of metacognition, self-regulation, repetition, retrieval practice, interleaving, spacing and fading that can be used to help our students create robust knowledge representations. We will share practical tips on how to incorporate ‘how people learn” best practices into your courses.
 
Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the different “how people learn” constructs
  • Explain how they can be applied to classroom practice
Session 5: Introduction to the Active Classroom 
Would you like to find ways to engage your students no matter the size of your class? What exactly is Active Learning, why does it promote significant learning, and how does an instructor create such a rich learning environment and get students to participate and deeply engage? Even in large courses, you can employ Active Learning strategies to increase your students’ motivation, improve their skills, and develop students higher order thinking skills. Come learn about practical Active Learning strategies to use in your own classroom. Please join us to discuss the practices of Active Learning, the benefits, and experience some active learning exercises. There will be a segment highlight UBC’s 14 year implementation of Team-Based Learning in large classes.
 
Learning Objectives:
  • Describe important characteristics of effective Active Learning
  • Distinguish between group work and team work
  • Develop a strategy to select an Active Learning method that works for you, your course and your students.
Session 6: Work smarter, not harder
This workshop will highlight strategies to increase your teaching effectiveness, efficiently handle repetitive course tasks, manage your classes better, and take care of yourself in the process.
 
Learning Objectives:
  • Describe different efficiency strategies that can be incorporate into your course
  • Identify specific strategies that could be applied to your teaching
  • Select a few strategies you want to use in your course
  • Plan how to implement one of those strategies
 

Learn MoreWorkshop 4A: Supporting blended learning through interactive creativity

June 03, 2018, 14:45 - 16:15

Workshop title: Supporting blended learning through interactive creativity

Workshop description: Innovative classroom practices such as flipped classrooms and blended learning have become increasingly popular initiatives within engineering education. Shifting from a traditional lecture format allows students to spend their individual study time on content concepts and their face-to-face instructor time on hands-on, experiential learning activities. However, instructors often find themselves focusing on the online content development, rather than developing enriching and valuable classroom activities.  This workshop will provide engineering educators with research-informed tools and techniques for implementing creative, interactive learning activities, even for large-scale courses. Participants will learn about the role and definition of creativity in engineering, proven techniques for advancing creative thinking, and lessons learned from the implementation of creative classroom work in both first year and fourth year technical courses.  Participants will work in interdisciplinary groups to explore creativity exercises and assessments, culminating in the collaborative creation of their own draft activity for a course of their choosing. The workshop will conclude with a review of the experience and suggestions for future development.

Facilitators | 1. Dr. Laleh Behjat, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary

Facilitators | 2. Dr. Mohammad Moshirpour, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary

Facilitators | 3. Ms. Emily Marasco, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Defining engineering creativity

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Developing interactive learning activities

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Best practices for creative exercises

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 4B: Fostering Interdisciplinary Competencies in Engineering Design through Co-curricular Design Reviews

June 03, 2018, 14:45 - 16:15

Workshop title: Fostering Interdisciplinary Competencies in Engineering Design through Co-curricular Design Reviews

Workshop description: In this workshop, the facilitators will lead participants through three exercises which will give the participants a first-hand experience of preparing for, interacting in, and reflecting upon an interdisciplinary design review. The participants will role-play as both engineering design students and students from non-engineering programs.

Facilitators | 1. Robert Fleisig, McMaster University

Facilitators | 2. Liz Hassan, McMaster University

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Be able to guide students through creating low-fidelity prototypes for interaction in design reviews.

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Be able to prepare their students to run a design review.

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Be able to guide their students through a design review involving both curricular and co-curricluar students.

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 4C: Systematic Reviews in Engineering Education Research: An Emerging Methodology. Part 1

June 03, 2018, 14:45 - 16:15

Workshop title: Systematic Reviews in Engineering Education Research: An Emerging Methodology. Part 1

Workshop description: This interactive workshop will introduce participants to the systematic review methodology and effectively using it for engineering education research. A common methodology in the health sciences, systematic reviews have recently been adopted by other disciplines, but not always successfully.  Participants will develop a sample research question and appraise existing systematic reviews in order to apply this method to their own research.  This 90 minute workshop can be taken alone or as Part 1 of 2 workshops offered.  

Facilitators | 1. Sarah Parker, Librarian. UBC Woodward Library

Facilitators | 2. Ursula Ellis. Librarian. UBC Woodward Library

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Describe the systematic review methodology and how it applies to engineering education

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Construct a question appropriate for a systematic review

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Appraise the quality of systematic reviews

Workshop learning objectives | 4. Identify protocols and inclusion and exclusion criteria in a systematic review

Learn MoreWorkshop 4D: EGAD Workshop 2: Working with Data

June 03, 2018, 14:45 - 16:15

Workshop title: EGAD Workshop 2: Working with Data

Workshop description: This is an introductory workshop intended to help those people who routinely work in GA/CI processes, or those who work with Graduate Attribute Data.  The workshop will progress through a six stage data analysis pipeline (Collect, Clean, Store, Analyze, Visualize, Communicate) and highlight principles of effective practise and provide examples of techniques at each stage.  It will provide an opportunity for participants pick up techniques, strategies and tools to work with data, compare and contrast approaches used within other institutions, and work with the community to start a new conversation thread in accreditation.

Facilitators | 1. Jake Kaupp, Queen's University

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Participants will be able to identify a multi-stage approach to working with data.

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Participants will be able to identify strategies for collecting, storing and communicating with data.

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Participants will be able to contrast the approach at their institution with those of other participants.

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 4E: Building a Community of Reflective and Responsive Researchers

June 03, 2018, 14:45 - 16:15

Workshop title: Building a Community of Reflective and Responsive Researchers

Workshop description: 

What’s your implicit epistemology and how is it ‘messing’ with your research?  Research as an activity has become an expectation of university life, necessary to both the policy and practice of tertiary education. The efficacy of our research informing policies and practices depends on the rigour of our research. Rigour depends on our ability to understand the appropriateness of, and ability to engage with, a variety of research methods. Understanding our own limitations and biases,as well as the advantages, limitations, and biases of different methodologies, facilitates the rigour with which we can define our research-methodology relationships and monitor data selection and interpretation. What constitutes rigorous research at all stages, from conception to dissemination? How does a researcher situate themselves within the larger epistemological conversation to exercise informed judgment? This workshop will explore these and other questions to advance the discussion around rigorous practices and policies in engineering education research. All are welcome. We encourage members who attended previous workshops (CEEA 2016 and CEEA 2017), as well as those part of the Reflective Researcher SIG, to attend.

Facilitators | 1. IER Team

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Understand epistemology and how it informs research and identify one’s dominant epistemology 

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Identify the advantages, limitations, and biases of different research methodologies

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Understand the relationship between researcher and research methodology and evaluate the researcher’s responsibility for reflexivity in the process of data selection and interpretation

Workshop learning objectives | 4. Identify criteria for rigour in engineering education research

Workshop learning objectives | 5. Identify current practices and policies that support rigour

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 5A: Asset mapping for engineering leadership: using unexpected allies to expand initiatives (a NICKEL workshop)

June 03, 2018, 16:30 - 18:00

Workshop title: Asset mapping for engineering leadership: using unexpected allies to expand initiatives (a NICKEL workshop)

Workshop description: Canadian engineering programs are at various stages in their development of engineering leadership initiatives. The National Initiative on Capacity Building and Knowledge Creation (NICKEL) offers support, networks and resources for those faculty and staff who seek to expand these offerings.  In this workshop, we focus directly on supporting participants to identify opportunities to expand their engineering leadership programming using existing assets and resources in their local context. To do this, we will mobilize research findings on the different options available in terms of size, scope, structure and resourcing. Participants will analyze critical trends and influences, both internal and external to their programs, to make decisions about where to invest their limited energy. We will introduce the Strategic Doing framework as a tool for prioritizing ideas and moving from thinking to action. This framework was extremely well received by the representatives of 14 universities who attended the first NICKEL conference in 2016. 

Facilitators | 1. Mike Klassen, University of Toronto

Facilitators | 2. John Donald, University of Guelph

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Participants understand the broader field of engineering leadership education and the wide range of programs, courses and activities being developed by other universities.

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Participants can identify and assess trends, influences and opportunities for expanding engineering leadership in their local context using a simple framework.

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Participants can apply the Strategic Doing framework to their own situation in order to prioritize and commit to tangible actions to move engineering leadership forward.

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 5B: Coaching and Facilitation for Teaching Engineering Design

June 03, 2018, 16:30 - 18:00

Workshop title: Coaching and Facilitation for Teaching Engineering Design

Workshop description: We propose to showcase a training workshop which we have developed to introduce coaching concepts to our teaching assistants (TAs) working in engineering design courses. Our aim is to share our work and encourage participants to replicate this training workshop at their home institutions. We will provide all relevant materials to interested participants. TAs strongly influence the educational experiences of undergraduate students in design courses. How they approach their role can define whether that influence is positive or negative. For many graduate students, the role of a TA is new and challenging, often due to a lack of transferrable experience. Often, they have been trained extensively in the engineering science model which emphasises knowledge acquisition. Drawing on this experience leads many to approach their TA role primarily as subject matter experts rather than facilitators of the learning process. This is especially problematic for TAs tasked with supporting students in engineering design courses.  TAs can more effectively support their students through open-ended decision processes central to design if they shift their perspectives so as to view themselves primarily as coaches. The workshop begins by defining the role of a coach as a supportive one. Coaches use introspection to motivate success in others. We then explore four psychological aspects which can affect student team performance in engineering design: having a “learner” mindset, functioning as self-directed learners, appreciating creativity as a skill which anyone can practice, and the evolution of small team dynamics according to Tuckman. By becoming aware of these, TAs will be better prepared to support their students. Stem sentences are introduced as the primary tool which participants can use as coaches. These are open-ended questions or statements designed to induce introspection. Identifying situations where a coaching intervention may be helpful and selecting appropriate stem sentences are explored through experiential activities. 

Facilitators | 1. Alexandros Dimopoulos, University of Victoria

Facilitators | 2. Eric Wilson, University of Victoria

Facilitators | 3. Kush Bubbar, University of Victoria

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Differentiate coaching from teaching and mentoring

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Recognize factors that give rise to student team success: effective mindsets, self-directed learning, creativity as a process, effective team dynamics

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Gain familiarity with coaching tools: mindsets and asking open-ended questions

Workshop learning objectives | 4. Practice using coaching tools

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 5C: Conducting a Systematic Review in Engineering Education Research. Part 2

June 03, 2018, 16:30 - 18:00

Workshop title: Conducting a Systematic Review in Engineering Education Research. Part 2

Workshop description: Participants in this activity focused workshop will delve a little deeper into the systematic review methodology.  A common methodology in the health sciences, systematic reviews have recently been adopted by other disciplines, but not always successfully. This workshop will have participants develop a search strategy, search article databases and grey literature sources. Additionally, time will be spent on the screening process and managing references, selecting articles based on the inclusion criteria.  This 90 minute workshop can be taken alone or in conjunction with the Part 1 workshop offered. 

Facilitators | 1. Ursula Ellis, Librarian. UBC Woodward Library

Facilitators | 2. Sarah Parker, Librarian. UBC Woodward Library

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Develop a structured and reproducible search

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Gain familiarity with engineering education databases and searching grey literature sources

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Develop best practices for managing and screening references

Workshop learning objectives | 4. Distinguish the various publication guidelines for systematic reviews

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 5D: How to Survive a CEAB Visit

June 03, 2018, 16:30 - 18:00

Workshop title: How to Survive a CEAB Visit

Workshop description: Having just been through a CEAB accreditation visit in Fall 2017, we would like to share some tips and reflections from our experience. The workshop will include an overview of how to engage faculty in the processes and a discussion on finding the right level of engagement. We will share examples of how having coordinated processes and clear templates facilitated the graduate attribute and data collection processes. We will also provide post-visit reflections, some lessons learned, and some challenges we are currently facing to maintain engagement and strive for continuous improvement. Overall, the goal of the workshop is to facilitate a vibrant discussion with attendees on the advantages and challenges of different approaches to "surviving a CEAB visit".

Facilitators | 1. Robyn Paul, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, rmpaul@ucalgary.ca

Facilitators | 2. Anders Nygren, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, nygren@ucalgary.ca

Facilitators | 3. Jeff Pieper, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary & CEAB Board Member, pieper@ucalgary.ca

 

Workshop learning objectives | 1. Discuss faculty engagement, and understand how to find the right balance between engagement and workload

Workshop learning objectives | 2. Give examples of templates and processes which can facilitate graduate attribute data collection

Workshop learning objectives | 3. Compare different approaches to graduate attribute data collection and the continuous improvement process.

 

Additional Options

GUEST ONLY Banquet Ticket

Cost: $100.00

If you are a conference registrant, please note that your personal banquet registration is included with your conference registration. This is to purchase tickets for NON conference registrants, like a spouse.  Please note: the Banquet is not a suitable venue for children.

GUEST ONLY Welcome Reception Ticket

Cost: $50.00

If you are a conference registrant, please note that your personal welcome reception registration is included with your conference registration. This is to purchase tickets for NON conference registrants, like a spouse.  Please note: the Banquet is not a suitable venue for children.

Conference Attendee Banquet

Cost: $0.00

Conference Attendee Welcome Reception

Cost: $0.00

Cancellation and Refund Policy

Notification of conference registration cancellation must be received by phone, mail, or fax by May 4, 2018 in order to receive a refund of a paid registration fee, less an administration fee of $100 CAD.

After May 4, 2018 cancellations will be subject to a processing fee of 50% of the total cost.

Registrations may be transferred without an administration fee upon notification by May 20, 2018.  

Memberships will not be refunded.

Building Foundations for Student Success

University of British Columbia

Vancouver, BC

June 3, 2018 - June 6, 2018

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