CEEA/ACEG 2015 ConferenceRegistration

Registration is closed

Regular Rates

Professional Rate: $625.00
Student Rate: $225.00

Early Bird Rates

Professional Rate: $525.00
Student Rate: $200.00

Workshops

A full day of Workshops will be held on Sunday, May 31, 2015 at the McMaster Campus.  There is a seperate charge for workshops and you can register at the same time as you register for the conference.

Workshop Fees

First Workshop: $ 50.00

All additional Workshops: $ 5.00 per workshop


 

Learn MoreWorkshop 1a: Active Learning Spaces (part 1)

May 31, 2015, 09:00 - 10:30

This is a half day workshop exploring Active Learning Spaces. The entire workshop will involve a series of active learning exercises, including ones designed by the participants during the workshop.  The primary themes that we will explore will be:

  1. The wide range of pedagogical practice that may be termed active learning; and
  2. The dependence of active learning exercises on the constraints of physical space.

Secondarily, we will explore other constraints, including subject matter, class size, and time constraints on the design and use of active learning exercises.

The first half of the workshop will be a series of active learning exercises including game scenarios, group discussion, group presentation, and physical modeling. The pedagogical subject matter of the different exercises will cover topics from electrical engineering, engineering education, geography (also applicable to crystallography), group dynamics, and learning technologies. But in each case, the discussion will focus on aspects of the physical space that allow the implementation of particular kinds of activities and will explore the impact of other constraints as mentioned above.

The second half of the workshop will involve activities designed by the participants working in the same groups that they would have formed during the first half. We will then explore more fully the issues that arise in adapting active learning exercises to different physical spaces.

Learn MoreWorkshop 1b: Teaching engineering students to design solutions to wicked problems

May 31, 2015, 09:00 - 10:30

Engineering design is a critical component of engineering education. Many prescriptive and descriptive models of engineering design exist and are used in higher education to teach students design skills and competencies. However, while these traditional pedagogies are suited for addressing well-defined problems, most neglect elements of design that are necessary to address the real-world “wicked” problems that engineers are increasingly called to face (e.g. climate change, childhood obesity, quality of life in vulnerable populations). We have developed a new design pedagogical framework, called the “W-model”, to enable engineering students to more effectively engage with complex problems. Pilot testing has indicated that novice design students who use the W-model to tackle a wicked problem perform at the level of an “informed designer”, whose level of competence is between that of a novice and expert designer. Specifically, students using the W-model: 1) continue to refine their understanding of the problem from project onset to project end; 2) practice idea fluency; 3) use higher order criteria to weigh benefits and tradeoffs of all ideas; 4) build knowledge of a problem throughout the design process through research and prototyping; 5) understand where they are in the overall design process and modify their design strategies accordingly; 6) go through multiple design cycle iterations; and 7) allow themselves to ‘backtrack’. This workshop is intended for engineering educators interested in using the W-model as a framework for design projects that address real-world problems. Using a combination of brief lectures, whole-group discussions and interactive exercises, we will introduce the elements of the W-model, compare and contrast it to existing design pedagogical frameworks, review evidence of its effectiveness, and provide workshop attendees with material that will enable them to implement the W-model as a framework for engineering design in their classrooms.

Learn MoreWorkshop 1c: A time for self-reflection: How can engineering educators bring lifelong learning to life?

May 31, 2015, 09:00 - 10:30

Lifelong learning has been widely identified by engineering accreditation boards in Canada, the United States, and internationally, as one of the attributes to be developed in students enrolled in undergraduate engineering degree programs. Additionally, there is a strong call from industry for graduates with the skills of lifelong learning to face complex and creative challenges. While previous research studies have investigated lifelong learning skills development and assessment, there is a continuous need for pedagogy that promotes lifelong learning in the current engineering curriculum. This workshop offers a professional development opportunity for CEEA 2015 conference attendees to explore themselves and their understanding of lifelong learning. How might an understanding of oneself as a lifelong learner transfer to one’s teaching and research practice? How might that, in turn, potentially enhance students’ capacity for lifelong learning? Knowledge about the self and the skills for self-reflection are important elements to identify one’s individual learning needs, motivation, and personal assessment methods. This workshop will provide an experiential learning opportunity for participants to explore how they position themselves as lifelong learners and how they may bring these values and attitudes to the classroom. Workshop participants will engage in self-reflection and discussion about their own engineering careers, pathways, research and teaching practice, and future goals. Participants will explore their self-knowledge about who they are and how they see themselves in their engineering education careers as lifelong learners. Theories of metacognition, self-regulation, and intrinsic motivation will be presented as a theoretical basis to ground participants’ exploration. Based on participants’ experiences, practical strategies and future opportunities for enriching one’s personal growth and teaching practice towards lifelong learning will be discussed.

This CEEA 2015 workshop is part of a current research project being conducted to support undergraduate engineering students in building capacity for lifelong learning. With participants’ consent, the data collected in this CEEA 2015 workshop will be collected and analyzed to support the current research project.

Learn MoreWorkshop 2a: Accreditation - Using a Murder Mystery to Cultivate Graduate Attributes

May 31, 2015, 10:30 - 12:00

The list of graduate attributes, those skills that the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) has determined are necessary for all engineering graduates to have, includes concrete skills, such as knowledge base and problem analysis, and intangible skills, such as lifelong learning and professionalism. Giving a lecture on the attribute of life-long learning could certainly expose students to the skill, and we can then hope that they see the value and incorporate it in their daily life. However, letting them experience the benefits of these skills will increase the potential for regular practice.

Mock scenarios are used in other professional programs such as medicine, nursing and business, often involving actors, to put the students into situations they are likely to experience in professional practice. In engineering, we can use a similar live-action case study where clues are distributed to characters who simulate a real event to let the students experience the chaos of an engineering crisis. In November 2014, the excitement of the Rosetta satellite sending the lander Philae to a comet provided an excellent opportunity for the students to learn about lifelong learning, interpersonal skills, teamwork, history of engineering, and provide a real-life engineering experience. Entitled the ‘Comet Caper’, students in 2 first-year and 1 second-year engineering class selected engineering roles such as program manager and systems, structural, and electrical engineers, each with a prescribed personality. They then received scripts, clues, and evidence, distributed over time in order to make decisions about the fate of Philae. The excitement during each of the three enactments of the caper was palpable, and students concluded with a reflection about the applicability to the real world.

In the workshop, participants will be provided with all necessary materials to administer the Comet Caper in their class, experience the excitement of the activity, and discuss ways to refine and adapt the caper to address the more intangible graduate attributes.

Learn MoreWorkshop 2b: Active Learning Spaces (part 2)

May 31, 2015, 10:30 - 12:00

This is a half day workshop exploring Active Learning Spaces. The entire workshop will involve a series of active learning exercises, including ones designed by the participants during the workshop. The primary themes that we will explore will be:
1. The wide range of pedagogical practice that may be termed active learning; and
2. The dependence of active learning exercises on the constraints of physical space.
Secondarily, we will explore other constraints, including subject matter, class size, and time constraints on the design and use of active learning exercises.

The first half of the workshop will be a series of active learning exercises including game scenarios, group discussion, group presentation, and physical modeling. The pedagogical subject matter of the different exercises will cover topics from electrical engineering, engineering education, geography (also applicable to crystallography), group dynamics, and learning technologies. But in each case, the discussion will focus on aspects of the physical space that allow the implementation of particular kinds of activities and will explore the impact of other constraints as mentioned above.

The second half of the workshop will involve activities designed by the participants working in the same groups that they would have formed during the first half. The second half of the workshop will be held in a different physical space than the first half. However, the participants will not be given this information before designing their activities. We will then explore more fully the issues that arise in adapting active learning exercises to different physical spaces. Themes that we expect to emerge include the wide range of what may be thought of as “active learning spaces,” the resilience of some active learning strategies with respect to constraints of physical space, and the importance of “plan B” as a pedagogical practice.

Learn MoreWorkshop 2c: Professional Career Planning Curriculum in Engineering Programs

May 31, 2015, 10:30 - 12:00

The University of Victoria’s Engineering program includes a mandatory Co-operative Education component, which sees graduates undertaking at least 16 months of relevant work experience before graduating. Through work with new graduates planning for their Engineer In Training (EIT) we identified the need for an arena where integration of experiential learning and academic learning could be facilitated.
Engineering 330: Professional Career Planning and Engineering Leadership is a course offered to UVic Engineering students for the first time in Spring 2014 as a complementary elective with full course credit towards their program. Integrating career development elements into program curriculum involves faculty engagement and collaborative efforts with an open mind and a long view. This course included an embedded mentoring program with senior students mentoring first year students, thus developing leadership skills while also contributing to program retention. Other elements were strategic volunteering and network building, including active interaction with professional engineers from local companies. A fundamental objective of this course is for the students to learn how to apply career management skills learned through co-op work terms to leverage engineering education into career success after graduation.
This workshop will share the strategies used in bringing this course to life, and will facilitate discussion of the broader faculty engagement, student engagement, and industry collaboration required when preparing near/new graduates for the transition to EIT positions in Industry.

Learn MoreWorkshop 3a: Accreditation - Introduction to graduate attribute processes

May 31, 2015, 13:00 - 14:00

This is an overview of using learning outcomes, and tools like curriculum mapping, course planning tables, and rubrics for data-informed curriculum improvement processes. Participants will work in teams on case studies to plan where, when and how to assess outcomes. Participants will also develop an assessment and development plan for particular indicators, including collecting the data, and how might it be used for program improvement.

Learn MoreWorkshop 3b: Panel - The importance of a sustainability thrust in an undergraduate engineering program

May 31, 2015, 13:00 - 14:00

Four panelists have been selected to address the question of whether or not is important that there be a sustainability thrust in an undergraduate engineering program. The four panelists comprise a current senior undergraduate engineering student, an engineering faculty member and two practicing professional engineers who deal with sustainability-related issues. Following a brief introduction by the panel moderator, each panelist will address the topic for 5 minutes. Panelists will then be asked to respond to several questions from the moderator after which panelists will respond to questions or comments from the audience.

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 3c: Designing a successful capstone project course (3 Hours)

May 31, 2015, 13:00 - 16:00

A successful and effective engineering capstone project course is year-long, in teams, solving a concrete problem, for an industrial partner, resulting in deliverables that can be assessed, and with plenty of feedback from a competent mentor. In this workshop, we’ll offer a set of “best practices”, templates, guidelines, and examples issued from the collective experience of a group of Canadian NSERC design engineering chairholders. For engineering capstone design project courses, one size does not fit all, but for most of the course design choices you’ll have to make, we lay out and discuss possible alternatives, provide pointers to background research, and give you criteria to make your own choices. Among these criteria are the constraints and demands of the CEAB graduate attributes, as many of these attributes are measurable in such capstone courses.

Duration: 3 hours
Format: a series of small presentations followed by small group discussions

Outline:

Overall course parameters
- learning objectives
- graduate attributes
- duration

Industry involvement
- industry partners
- project definition
- role of the partner
- IP issues
- fees or no fees
- budget

Student team
- team size and formation
- team dynamics
- reflection and team dynamic evaluation
- self- and peer-assessment

Design process
- Life-cycle, milestones
- Artifacts, project portfolio
- Tools

Communication
- Written report
- Presentation
- other media literacy: videos, web based tools

Supervision
- mentors, TAs
- evaluation, rubrics
- teaching load

Complementary classes
- Guest speakers, case studies,
- Professional practice
- Ethics, economics and regulatory compliance
- project management

Putting it together

Learn MoreWorkshop 4a: Accreditation - Data-informed improvement

May 31, 2015, 14:00 - 15:00

This workshop focuses on how administrators and instructors can use data, drawn from a variety of assessment approaches and tools, to improve the student learning environment. Participants will work in teams on a realistic case study drawn from actual student data, reviewing indicators, assessments, curriculum maps and student performance presented through different visualizations. Teams will be responsible for suggesting potential improvements, discussing alternative ways of interpreting assessment data, and talk about the use of different and varied tools, methods and approaches for assessing graduate attributes.

Learn MoreWorkshop 4b: Defining the Ideas Clinicâ„¢ for Canadian Engineering Educators

May 31, 2015, 14:00 - 15:00

The Engineering Ideas Clinic Experience

  1.  Bishop, S. Mohamed, A. Trivett, J. Grove, J. Baleshta, A. Hurst, B. Mantin, C. Rennick, C.Hulls, M. Robinson, S. Bedi

Experiential learning is a degree-level expectation of the undergraduate curriculum at the University of Waterloo.  Experiential learning is currently accomplished through co-operative education and labs in undergraduate courses.  This presentation examines another model for implementing experiential learning that introduces some of the benefits of co-operative education into workshops in an undergraduate course.  This model is referred to as an Ideas Clinic Experience.

An Ideas Clinic Experience delivers both horizontal integration (i.e., integration across disciplines) and vertical integration (i.e., integration across program years).  Such experiential learning activities have the potential to leverage the advantages of a co-operative education experience in the context of an undergraduate course.  Students are given an opportunity to face challenges outside of their discipline while also interacting with students, staff, and faculty from other disciplines.  An Ideas Clinic Experience prepares students to work effectively in a multi-disciplinary setting.

This session presents an ambitious project by the Faculty of Engineering to introduce an Ideas Clinic Experience into every undergraduate engineering program.  First, the general philosophy of the Ideas Clinic Experience will be introduced.  Next, the essential elements of an Ideas Clinic Experience will be described.  This will be followed by a brief demonstration of pilot projects implemented in September 2014:

  1. Disassembling a Coffee Maker
  2. Exploring Products in the Repair Café
  3. Manufacturing a Key Chain
  4. Assembling a Remote-Control Car
  5. Building an Electric Motor
  6. Measuring venturi pressure in a carburetor

For each activity, the instructors will present an introduction, the expected learning outcomes, the resource requirements, and student feedback on the activity.  Attendees will have an opportunity to interact with the designs created by the workshops.  Lessons learned from each of the pilot projects will be highlighted.  This session will conclude with reflection and discussion on the role of clinic activities in engineering education and the potential to introduce an Ideas Clinic Experience into your own courses.

 

Learn MoreWorkshop 5a: Accreditation - Alignment of Assessments, Course Learning Outcomes and Program Learning Outcomes

May 31, 2015, 15:00 - 16:00

At the program level, an outcomes-based curriculum improvement process relies on the deliberate assessment of key course level learning activities. In order to identify the most appropriate learning activities to assess in courses for the purposes of program level assessment, course activities must be constructively aligned to program level learning outcomes (Biggs, 1999). This alignment can prove challenging, as it requires that instructors and administrators not only apply constructive alignment within courses and within the program as a whole, but also consider what and how to assess at each level.
In response to this challenge, the University of Guelph’s Open Learning and Educational Support (OpenEd) and School of Engineering (SOE) developed a six-step process that guides faculty in linking course level learning activities with the assessment of program level outcomes for the purposes of continuous improvement/accreditation.
This hands-on session will introduce participants to this process by inviting participants to align course activities and assessments with program outcomes. Participants will discuss how this process balances instructor autonomy in course administration and assessment with program level data acquisition and reporting. Participants will further reflect on how such a process could be adapted and/or applied in their unique institutional and departmental settings.
Reference: Biggs, J. (1999). What the student does: Teaching for enhanced learning. Higher Education Research & Development 18(1), 57-75.

Learn MoreWorkshop 5b:Active Learning in the Engineering Classroom

May 31, 2015, 15:00 - 16:00

In our traditional classrooms we seem to encourage surface and strategic learning instead of the deep learning required for true mastery of our discipline. This workshop explores active learning strategies where, by challenging beliefs about the tried-and-true roles of the teacher and the student, you can increase student accountability, engage them in a dynamic learning environment, and improve their depth of learning.

Learn MoreWorkshop 6a: Support Technical learning using short Audio/Video Tutorials

May 31, 2015, 16:00 - 17:30

Several Electronic and Computer Engineering courses in higher education involve practical or computer-aided labs, where students engage in specific design activities (e.g. board design or mounting, measurement labs, embedded systems design, circuit or computer architecture design). Such activities are often strictly related to the students’ future careers, so they invariably find the activities engaging and exciting. On the other hand, before “the fun part” can begin, they need to build specific competence, not only on the subject, but in the usage of the lab tools, that can be complex and feature specific rules and syntax to be followed.
Especially in large classes, many students lament the use of written how-to guides and tutorials in labs as boring and not engaging. Few may even give up understanding tutorials at all, limiting to passive application of instructions that gives no added value to the understanding of the topic or to their life-long learning perspectives. A possible idea is to develop and offer students You-Tube – like Video Tutorials demonstrating the usage of lab tools and equipment: While not substituting written instructions, A/V Tutorials may complement them easing the impact with the lab environment: hopefully the video will lower students initial resistance making the transition from the “passive” learning phase to the “active” design phase easier and quicker. This may make their approach to the Lab environment easier and more engaging.

This workshop proposes to share the experience of developing and offering video tutorials for a 4th year electronic circuits design course in SFU:
Describe the design process utilized in structuring the educational videos, introduce the impact of A/V tutorials on students engagement and performance, explore which educational contents appear more suitable to be included in short videos, discuss with the audience how to use videos to develop design skills in various engineering contexts.

Learn MoreWorkshop 6b: Collaborative testing: how it works, why it works, working to make it better, and how to apply it in your class.

May 31, 2015, 16:00 - 17:00

Evaluation and assessment in post secondary education tends to be on an individual basis, despite the fact that having to express and explain reasoning, and reach consensus with colleagues are valuable team-based skills. As instructors we can develop these additional skills by introducing collaboration into evaluation. In addition, we can introduce peer learning, which is a technique that engages the student more fully (Mazur). Combining peer learning with assessment, right after a conventional test or exam has been shown to be tremendously successful at many levels, (Gilley and Clarkston).

In this workshop we will show evidence collected in a variety of programs (Nursing and Chemical Engineering), with a variety of courses (theoretical, analytical, mathematical, conceptual), and at all levels (from first year to final year), and class sizes (50 to 400). In every case there has been overwhelmingly positive qualitative student reviews.

The procedure, when first described to instructors can appear overwhelming to coordinate, from a logistical point of view. The process is rather simple, and always works out in a classroom environment. In this 1-hour proposed workshop we will demonstrate the procedure by engaging participants in a collaborative setting. We will provide detailed logistical steps for implementation in your classroom. After the demonstration we discuss the pros and cons of various protocol decisions that can be used to fine-tune this practice.

We have also started work on a new addition: providing immediate feedback to students. Using the Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique (IF-AT), answers to questions are revealed using scratch cards. Self-assessment and self-learning are promoted with immediate feedback, important facets of metacognitive skill development that can lead to improved individual academic performance (Carvalho). We hypothesize that providing feedback at a moment when students are most receptive for the guided answer promotes retention, and substantially overcomes drawbacks from mark inflation due to collaborative testing without feedback (Molsbee). Tentative data are already collected, and we will complete the collection and analysis by end of April 2015.

Mazur, E (1997). Peer Instruction. Prentice Hall.

Gilley, B. & Clarkston, B. (2014). Collaborative Testing: Evidence of Learning in a Controlled In-Class study of Undergraduate Students. Journal of College Science Teaching, 43(3) 83-91.

Carvalho, M. (2010). Assessing changes in performance and monitoring processes in individual and collaborative tests according to students' metacognitive skills. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 22(7) 1107-1136.

Molsbee, C. (2013). Collaborative Testing and Mixed Results. Teaching and Learning in Nursing, 8, 22-25.

Learn MoreWorkshop 6c: Student Workshop: Meet & Greet and Formalizing a Student Society DO NOT REGISTER HERE SEE BELOW!

May 31, 2015, 16:00 - 17:00

 STUDENTS ONLY at no charge - see Additional Options for student registration.

The CEEA member network has been steadily growing since its first conference in 2010 and as this network has grown, an increasing number of students have committed to engineering education, both as a research area and a profession. The primary goal of this workshop is to provide students attending the CEEA conference with an opportunity to network with one other. Participants will engage in a meet and greet activity followed by round table discussions of some successes and challenges that they have experienced in their education, or engineering education research. The secondary purpose of the workshop is to connect CEEA members, particularly student members, who may be interested in creating a Canadian Engineering Education Students’ Society. This part of the workshop will include a brainstorming session that will inform the possible goals, vision/mission statement, and future activities of a formalized students’ society, and will serve to gauge interest in the idea. This workshop is designed to build a network of students and other CEEA member supporters, aligning with CEEA’s goals of encouraging and supporting the development and sharing of best practices between Canadian engineering institutions as well as engaging students.

Additional Options

Banquet - Guest Ticket

Cost: $60.00

Welcome Event - Guest Ticket

Cost: $40.00

Banquet - Attendee Ticket

Cost: $0.00

Ice Breaker - Attendee Ticket

Cost: $0.00

Student Workshop: Meet & Greet and Formalizing a Student Society

Cost: $0.00

If you are not a student - please choose 0 as your response for this item.  Thank you.

May 31, 2015 16:00-17:00

The CEEA member network has been steadily growing since its first conference in 2010 and as this network has grown, an increasing number of students have committed to engineering education, both as a research area and a profession. The primary goal of this workshop is to provide students attending the CEEA conference with an opportunity to network with one other. Participants will engage in a meet and greet activity followed by round table discussions of some successes and challenges that they have experienced in their education, or engineering education research. The secondary purpose of the workshop is to connect CEEA members, particularly student members, who may be interested in creating a Canadian Engineering Education Students’ Society. This part of the workshop will include a brainstorming session that will inform the possible goals, vision/mission statement, and future activities of a formalized students’ society, and will serve to gauge interest in the idea. This workshop is designed to build a network of students and other CEEA member supporters, aligning with CEEA’s goals of encouraging and supporting the development and sharing of best practices between Canadian engineering institutions as well as engaging students.

 

Cancellation and Refund Policy

Notification of conference registration cancellation must be received by phone, mail, or fax by May 9, 2015 in order to receive a refund of a paid registration fee, less an administration fee of $100 CAD.

After May 9, 2015 cancellations will be subject to a processing fee of 50% of the total cost.

Registrations may be transferred without an administration fee upon notification by May 23, 2015.  

Memberships will not be refunded.

Experiential Engineering Education

McMaster University

Hamilton, Ontario

May 31, 2015 - June 3, 2015

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